Missourians going to vote will need to declare party affiliation for Tuesday’s presidential primary

Democrat and Republican Parties

Missouri’s local election officials are projecting about a 40 percent voter turnout for Tuesday’s presidential preference primary.

Polls will open Tuesday morning at 6 and will close at 7 p.m. statewide.

Under Missouri law, you can only choose one political party ballot at the primary: Republican, Democratic, Libertarian, Green or Constitution.  Poll workers will ask you to choose one of the five-party ballots, so you will need to declare your party affiliation on Tuesday.

There are several former Democratic presidential candidates who’ve dropped out who remain on Tuesday’s ballot in Missouri because it was too late to take them off the ballot.  They include U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota), U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-New Jersey) and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

This will be the sixth consecutive time that Missouri has held presidential preference primaries. The state held them in 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016.

Missouri’s Legislature adopted the presidential preference primary in 1986, for one PPP to be held in 1988. At the time, some said it was aimed at helping then-U.S. Rep. Richard Gephardt, D-St. Louis County, in his 1988 presidential campaign.

Congressman Gephardt ended his presidential run in March 1988, and ran again and was re-elected to his congressional seat.

Missouri used caucuses in 1992 and 1996. In 1998, the Missouri Legislature approved a PPP with no expiration date. That was Senate Bill 709, which was signed by then-Governor Mel Carnahan.

The Missouri Secretary of State’s Office encourages anyone with questions about Tuesday’s presidential preference primary to call Secretary Ashcroft’s office. That number is 1-800-669-8683.

Copyright © 2020 · Missourinet

Brian Hauswirth

About Brian Hauswirth

Brian Hauswirth began as Missourinet news director in July 2016. He anchors daily newscasts, simulcasts and special reports from the Missouri Capitol in Jefferson City, where he primarily covers the Missouri House and numerous legislative committee hearings.