Ballot initiatives on medical marijuana in the November 6th election simplified

Medical Marijuana

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018, voters will see three medical marijuana initiatives on their ballots—Amendment 2, Amendment 3, and proposition C. Voters are permitted to vote “yes” or “no” on each of the ballot measures. You can read the full text of each ballot issue in the November 6 General Election by going to the Missouri Secretary of State website.

If two conflicting constitutional amendments, such as Amendment 2 and Amendment 3, are approved, the one receiving the most “yes” votes prevails.

What would Amendment 2 change about marijuana policies in Missouri?

Amendment 2 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with nine qualifying conditions and additional conditions with a doctor’s approval.

Patients would be allowed to grow six flowering plants in their homes; purchase 4 ounces of dried marijuana or equivalent, and possess not less than a 60-day supply of dried marijuana or equivalent (more permitted with written certification from two independent physicians). Amendment 2 would tax the sale of medical marijuana at 4 percent and allocate revenue from the tax toward providing health care services, job training, housing assistance, and other services for veterans. Amendment 2 would task the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services with overseeing and regulating the state’s medical marijuana program. The ballot initiative would authorize not less than 24 dispensaries in each of the state’s eight congressional districts, based on 2018 boundaries.

Missouri has legalized the medical use of cannabidiol (CBD), also known as cannabis oil, one of the non-psychoactive ingredients found in marijuana. Both medical and recreational marijuana are illegal under federal law. However, the U.S. Congress had included an amendment, known as the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment, in each omnibus spending bill since 2014.

The Rohrabacher–Farr amendment prohibited federal agents from raiding medical marijuana growers in states where medical marijuana is legal. In 2017, Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) asked Congress to not renew the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment for the upcoming fiscal year. Congress, however, approved the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment for the fiscal year ending on September 30, 2018. 

Full text of Missouri Amendment 2

Missouri Amendment 2: New Approach Missouri is leading the campaign in support of Amendment 2.

Amendment 2 provides a way to make Missouri a state to allow medical marijuana. It puts health care decisions back into the hands of doctors and their patients, and, of the three ballot options, is the only one backed by a coalition of patients, veterans and doctors. As a constitutional amendment, it becomes a permanent part of Missouri law.

Amendment 2 requires the Missouri Department of Health to act and enable implementation by drafting rules and regulations to administer the law.

Under Amendment 3 Doctor Brad Bradshaw writes himself into the Missouri Constitution as the chairman of a new quasi-state agency and research institute and grants him the authority to appoint its board members. The institute would not only direct how taxpayer money is spent but also write and implement the rules and regulations on licensing and dispensing.

You can read more on Doctor Brad Bradshaw by clicking this link to an article in the Springfield News-Leader.

Amendment 2 levies a tax rate of 4% on medical marijuana sales and the revenue generated funds veterans’ services in the state while Amendment 3 has a 15% sales tax, the highest medical marijuana tax in the nation, directed to the new research institute. 

New Approach Missouri is a coalition of medical professionals, patients, former public safety officials, and advocates working to pass Amendment 2 because they believe it is the best way forward to legalize medical marijuana for patients with serious and debilitating illnesses

 

Full text of Missouri Amendment 3

Missouri Amendment 3: Find The Cures is leading the campaign in support of Amendment 3.

Access for Patients

A list of qualifying conditions, which may be expanded by the Research Board when reliable scientific data shows additional conditions will benefit from medical marijuana treatment.

Medical Marijuana is a medicine.

As a real medicine, Amendment 3 requires medical marijuana to be sold in dispensaries with pharmacist consultations available.

Amendment 3 is for Missourians Only

For an individual to grow or sell medical marijuana, they must be a Missouri resident. Entities must be 70% or more owned by Missouri residents.

Everyone in Missouri can participate.

With over three times the licenses of the other proposals combined, Amendment 3 has the most licenses to cultivate. Amendment 3 also encourages co-ops for farmers, and LLCs-joint ventures for businesses.

Monopolies are prohibited.

No person or entity can own more than 1% of the licenses to cultivate. Everyone gets a chance to be involved.

A Cancer Research Center

It is estimated that $66 million would be generated annually for Cancer and Disease Research. Each dollar will generate up to 4 additional matching dollars annually, bringing the annual total to upwards of $330 million to cure cancer and other diseases. Doctor Bradshaw touts that Missouri will become a world leader in medical research and he estimates that 10,000 plus new high paying jobs will be created. 

Research Center Location, Satellite Centers

After the board from the institute recommends five optimum locations, Missouri voters will decide where the main research center will be located. Missouri Universities will have affiliated satellite research centers.

Income Tax Refund

An Income tax refund check to you annually with 50% of the money generated from the research institute required to be given back to Missouri residents in the form of an annual income tax refund.  Take note, that the refund check is from funds generated by the research institute, not the direct sale of medical marijuana.

Law Enforcement

Amendment 3 provides almost $2 million in annual funding for local law enforcement, which is a drop in the bucket when it comes to law enforcement spending. Amendment 3 also requires Medical Marijuana to be cultivated in locked secure and safe environments, and only with a proper license to cultivate.

Missouri Schools and Education

Doctor Bradshaw estimates that cancer and disease research will generate millions of dollars annually for Missouri’s schools and Missouri students, plus additional millions of dollars specifically set aside for Missouri Universities.

Full text of Missouri Proposition C

Missouri Proposition C, the Medical Marijuana and Veterans Healthcare Services, Education, Drug Treatment, and Public Safety Initiative, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated state statute on November 6, 2018.

A “yes” vote supports this initiated statute to:

  • legalize marijuana for medical purposes;
  • tax marijuana sales at 2 percent; and
  • spend tax revenue on veterans’ services, drug treatment, education, and law enforcement.
A “no” vote opposes this initiated statute to:

  • legalize marijuana for medical purposes;
  • tax marijuana sales at 2 percent; and
  • spend tax revenue on veterans’ services, drug treatment, education, and law enforcement.

What would Proposition C change about marijuana policies in Missouri?

Proposition C would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with nine qualifying conditions and additional conditions with a doctor’s approval.

Patients would be allowed to purchase 2.5 ounces of marijuana flower or equivalent in a 14-day period and possess a 60-day supply of marijuana flower or equivalent.

Proposition C would enact a 2 percent sales tax on marijuana and dedicate revenue to veterans’ services, drug treatment, education, and public safety.

Proposition C would task the state Senior Services and Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Control and Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services with overseeing and regulating the state’s medical marijuana program.

The ballot initiative would authorize not less than one cannabis center, which would sell marijuana, per 100,000 state residents.