Missouri Senate leaders respond to veto of gun bill

Gun Rights

Jefferson City- Senate Republican leaders voiced their displeasure with the governor’s veto of Senate Bill 656. Passed during the final week of session, the legislation strengthens the Second Amendment right of all Missourians to keep and bear arms.

“I am disappointed to hear the governor vetoed a common-sense bill that expands the rights of law-abiding citizens to protect themselves and their families,” stated Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard (R-Joplin).

Through the legislation, lawmakers hoped to give Missourians the right to protect themselves and their families at all times. Supporters of SB 656 believe it has the potential to save lives.

“In an era when we see radical Islamic terrorists shifting their focus to attacks on targets such as employee Christmas parties in San Bernardino or nightclubs in Orlando, we should be doing all we can to make sure the citizens of Missouri have the ability to protect themselves,” said Sen. Brian Munzlinger (R-Williamstown), the sponsor of the legislation. “It is hard to believe our governor would veto a bill that gives Missourians the ability to protect themselves.”

The Missouri House of Representatives and Missouri Senate approved the legislation by a veto- proof margin. Senate leaders are dedicated to addressing the governor’s actions during the upcoming veto session.

“This issue was a priority with our caucus and passed the Senate by an overwhelming vote,” added Senate Majority Floor Leader Mike Kehoe (R-Jefferson City). “I fully expect that we will override the governor’s veto in September when we reconvene for our annual veto session.”

Senate leaders believe this bill is vital to protecting the lives of all Missourians and are determined to take the necessary steps to override the governor’s veto.

“We are told there are currently investigations of radical terrorist elements in all 50 states,” added Sen. Munzlinger. “Let’s not forget the satellite phone used by Osama Bin Laden to call in attacks on U.S. embassies in Africa was purchased by a radicalized student at the University of Missouri. No place is safe from the threat of terror and there are not enough law enforcement officers to be everywhere at once. We must allow law-abiding citizens to protect themselves. This bill was a significant step in that direction and I am determined to override this shocking veto.”

Lawmakers return to the State Capitol on September 14 for the annual veto session to address any legislation vetoed by the governor.